Welsh: Three More Tales of Fairies

For another story about fairy money and cockleshells, see this story in the other Welsh unit: Dick the Fiddler's Money (there's a note about cockleshells there).

The third story here is a changeling story; for more about fairies and changelings, see this excellent essay by Dan Ashliman: Changelings.

[Notes by LKG]

This story is part of the Welsh (Emerson) unit. Story source: Welsh Fairy-Tales and Other Stories by Peter H. Emerson (1894).


The Old Man and the Fairies
Many years ago, the Welsh mountains were full of fairies. People used to go by moonlight to see them dancing for they knew where they would dance by seeing green rings in the grass.

There was an old man living in those days who used to frequent the fairs that were held across the mountains. One day he was crossing the mountains to a fair and, when he got to a lonely valley, he sat down for he was tired, and he dropped off to sleep, and his bag fell down by his side.

When he was sound asleep, the fairies came and carried him off, bag and all, and took him under the earth, and when he awoke, he found himself in a great palace of gold, full of fairies dancing and singing. And they took him and showed him everything, the splendid gold room and gardens, and they kept dancing round him until he fell asleep.

When he was asleep, they carried him back to the same spot where they had found him, and when he awoke, he thought he had been dreaming, so he looked for his bag and got hold of it, but he could hardly lift it. When he opened it, he found it was nearly filled with gold.

He managed to pick it up and, turning round, he went home.

When he got home, his wife Kaddy said: "What's to do, why haven't you been to the fair?"

"I've got something here," he said and showed his wife the gold.

"Why, where did you get that?"

But he wouldn't tell her. Since she was curious, like all women, she kept worrying him all night — for he'd put the money in a box under the bed — so he told her about the fairies.

Next morning, when he awoke, he thought he'd go to the fair and buy a lot of things, and he went to the box to get some of the gold, but found it full of cockle-shells.

Tommy Pritchard
Tommy Pritchard was going to school one day, and on his way he thought he heard somebody singing on the other side of a stone wall by the road, so he climbed up and looked over, and there underneath a stone he saw a sixpence, so he took it.

Every morning after that when he went to school, he used to look in the same place, and he always found a sixpence.

His father noticed he was always spending money in the sweet-shop, so he began to think Tommy was stealing from somebody, and one day he asked him where he got the money. Tommy wouldn't tell at first, but his father threatened to beat him, so he told him where he got his sixpences.

Next morning he went to look in the same place for his sixpence, and he found nothing but a cockle-shell. And he never saw anything but a cockle-shell there afterwards.


Kaddy's Luck
There was a tall young woman whom the fairies used to visit, coming through the keyhole at night. She could hear them dancing and singing in her room, but in the morning they used to go the way they had come, only they always left her some money.

When she got married she chose a tall husband like herself, and they had a fine big child.

One night they went to a fair, and they got to one side to hear the fairies, for some people could tell when the fairies were coming for they made a noise like the wind. Whilst they were waiting, she told her husband how the fairies used to leave her money at night.

When they got home, they found their baby all right, and went to bed. But next morning the young mother found her child had been changed in the night, and there was a very little baby in the cradle. And the child never grew big, for the fairies had changed her child for spite.

(600 words)



No comments:

Post a Comment

Comments for Google accounts; you can also contact me at laura-gibbs@ou.edu.