Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Greek Myth: Pygmalion and the Statue

Pygmalion was a sculptor of marble statues. One day, he carved a woman who was so beautiful that he fell in love with her. He spent his days gazing at the statue and, at night, he slept on the floor of his studio, curled around the feet of the statue. He disdained all other women and loved only his statue.

Driven mad with love, Pygmalion decided to implore the goddess Aphrodite for help. He went to the goddess's temple, bearing many gifts to offer in sacrifice. "O most powerful goddess," he prayed, "I beg you to turn the statue into a living woman."

Aphrodite was impressed by Pygmalion's devotion and decided to help him. So, at dawn of the next morning, while Pygmalion was sleeping at the foot of the statue, the goddess entered his studio. When she saw the statue, she smiled with amazement at how beautiful the marble woman was. She then wrapped her arms around the statue. In the embrace of the goddess, the statue began to breathe. The cold marble turned to warm flesh, and the statue became a living woman!

Pygmalion, meanwhile, awoke from his sleep. He rubbed his eyes and then looked up towards the statue. He could not believe his eyes! In a whisper he said to himself, "Is this a dream?" Slowly, he reached out his hand and, to his amazement, his beloved descended from the pedestal, taking her place by his side. Pygmalion wept with joy as he took her in his arms, barely able to believe his good fortune. He spent the rest of his days in the joyful company of his beloved creation, forever thanking Aphrodite for the miracle she had performed.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Comments for Google accounts; you can also contact me at laura-gibbs@ou.edu.